As winter makes its chilly way toward the Midwest, writers don sweaters and steep tea in anticipation of shorter days and longer nights in which to write.

Calendars are already overflowing with traditional gatherings and new adventures, so WordWrites Guild will host only one meeting this month – on November 8th in the Depot Room of the Lawrenceburg Public Library from 6:00-8:00pm.

Please note that our next gathering will be our annual Open House, held on Thursday, December 13th from 6:30-7:30pm in the Depot Room of the Lawrenceburg Public Library.

All writers are welcome to escape the maelstrom and join this relaxing, encouraging and supportive group.

 

The last meeting brought an interesting discussion of clichés, which led to an interesting discussion of idioms, which led to an interesting discussion of Spoonerisms, which led to an interesting discussion of Malapropisms, which led to an interesting discussion of eggcorns, which led to an interesting discussion of . . . well, you get the idea. Good thing you do because these are the topics for the November meeting’s writing prompt. To help you along, here are definitions for each term. Use one or more examples of these in your writing this week.

A cliché is an expression that has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or even to the point of being trite or irritating.  Examples: cold, hard cash or going bananas.

An idiom is a phrase or expression that means something different from what the words actually say. Example: using over his head for didn’t understand.

A Spoonerism is an accidental transposition of initial consonants in a pair or words. Example: well-boiled icicle instead of well-oiled bicycle.

A Malapropism is the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similar. Example: a musical progeny for a musical prodigy.

An eggcorn is a word or phase that results from a mishearing or misinterpretation of another. Examples: for all intensive purposes instead of for all intents and purposes or doggie dog world for dog-eat-dog world.

Use whatever examples you find–or create–to complete your story, poem, or essay. Be ready to share at WordWrites Guild on November 8. Everyone is welcome!

 

 

 

 

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